Psoriasis Vs Eczema: How Do You Differentiate Them?

Psoriasis Vs Eczema: How Do You Differentiate Them?

Psoriasis and Eczema are two skin disorders that look pretty much the same in the layman’s eyes. Since both look like patches of dry and flaky skin, it is understandable why people confuse the two. But both these conditions are different from each other.

This article will touch upon the differences between eczema and psoriasis, so you can better recognize them when they show up.

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a type of skin disorder known to be an autoimmune condition. It causes skin cells to grow too fast, which results in redness, scaliness, and irritation. Psoriasis takes many forms and can be mild or severe, depending on the person’s condition. 

What is Eczema?

Eczema is a type of inflammatory skin disease. It is marked by itchiness, irritation, redness, scaling, discoloration, and severe dryness. Eczema harms the skin barrier function, which makes your skin prone to infections. Eczema usually results from a combination of genetics and environmental factors. The condition can be managed with proper treatment.

How are Psoriasis and Eczema Similar?

Eczema and psoriasis can both cause a rash. The rash appears as red patches on the skin, which are itchy and may form on the scalp and hands. Neither is contagious but can cause infections.

Psoriasis Versus Eczema: Differences

Triggers

Psoriasis:

Psoriasis can be triggered by injuries from accidents, cut, or scrape. Also, vaccines, shots, and sunburns could be triggers. 

Heavy consumption of alcohol can also trigger Psoriasis flare-ups. Continuous consumption of alcohol in large quantities may lead to Psoriasis outbreaks. High stress can also trigger psoriasis.

Eczema:

Eczema is affected by various triggers, including environmental factors like dry weather, cold, dampness, pets fur, molds, house dust, and pollen. 

Irritants like soap, detergents, and disinfectants can trigger eczema. Stress and changes in your hormones are also some of the significant triggers of eczema.

Symptoms

Psoriasis:

The symptoms of psoriasis are redness, flaking, scaling, and irritation. The condition can affect the scalp, nails, elbows, or knees. In addition to the palms and soles, this condition may also affect them. It usually appears as patches and plaques.

Eczema:

The symptoms of eczema are redness, itchiness, irritation, flaking, scaling, and red patches. It occurs on the neck, ankle, inner elbow, and knee. In infants, eczema shows up on their chest, scalp, legs, chin, arm, and back. 

Appearance

Psoriasis:

A red patch appears on the skin when psoriasis is present. They are silvery and scaly, as well as raised. When you look carefully, you see thicker and more inflamed skin compared to eczema.

Eczema:

Your skin becomes red and inflamed when you have eczema. Depending on the condition, it may be crusted, oozing, or scaly. Sometimes dark patches of rough, leathery skin appear. Additionally, it may result in swelling.

Age of First Appearance

Psoriasis:

You can get psoriasis between the ages of 15 and 35. Although, in some cases, it can show up in other periods. Infants typically don’t have psoriasis.

Eczema:

On the other hand, Eczema starts in babies or younger children, and the symptoms often improve as the child grows. Although it is unusual for adults to get eczema, it is possible. Whenever an adult has eczema, it is usually a result of stress, hormonal changes, or thyroid disease.

Linked Conditions

Psoriasis:

Psoriasis is usually associated with depression, diabetes, heart disease, or some other severe health condition. 

Eczema:

Dry, sensitive skin is usually associated with it. Someone in your family might have eczema, hay fever, or asthma.

Treatment

Psoriasis:

Psoriasis treatment often involves UVB therapy, oral medications, or light therapy. Sometimes your doctor may recommend corticosteroids to ease the symptoms.

Eczema:

Eczema does not yet have a cure. Skin healing and preventing flare-ups of symptoms are the primary goals of treatment. Treatment plans are set by a person’s age, symptoms, and current health. Eczema may disappear over time for some people. While it may be a temporary condition for some, it may last a lifetime.

Treatments include topical corticosteroid creams and ointments, antibiotics, barrier repair moisturizers, injected biologic drugs, oral medications, and home remedies.

Summary

Psoriasis and eczema are two common skin conditions. Although they look similar, they have differences. Understanding the differences between these two skin disorders will help you manage them when they hit.