Low White Blood Cell Count – Symptoms, Causes

Low White Blood Cell Count – Symptoms, Causes

Symptoms of low white blood cell occur when the number of white blood cells in the blood decreases. This could indicate that the body is fighting an infection, and it could be the result of a viral infection or bacterial infection. 

Low white blood cells indicate a low count of these cells, which are the first line of defense for the immune system. Leukopenia is a condition that may result from this process. Low white blood cell count is called leukopenia in medical terms.

What are White Blood Cells?

White blood cells are the immune cells in your blood. They are the first cells to respond when your body is infected. In addition, white blood cells play a significant role in the body’s defense mechanisms. White blood cells are also called leukocytes.

They are involved in fighting infections and cancers and also protecting the body from diseases. It is one of the essential parts of the immune system, and it is composed of several types of cells, including neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, and monocytes.

What is a Low White Blood Cell Count?

Low white blood cells result due to low white blood cells count. The body’s immune system relies on white blood cells present in minimal quantities in the blood. In normal circumstances, they are typically present in the blood between 4,500 and 11,000 microliters.

An insufficient number of white blood cells in the blood (some laboratories say less than 4,500) could indicate that your body cannot fight infection properly. Low white blood cell counts are called leukopenia.

Symptoms of Low White Blood Cell

Low white blood cells may be a sign of a variety of different diseases. In some cases, low white blood cells may be a sign of an infection. For instance, if you have a fever and low white blood cells, this may signify a disease.

The low white blood cells may also be a sign of an infection if you have a fever and no other disease symptoms. This is known as a low white blood cell count with fever.

If you have a fever and low white blood cells, you may have a viral infection. In these cases, your doctor will check your throat and lungs to find the source of the disease. If your doctor cannot find an infection, your doctor may order a test to check for a bacterial infection.

Low white blood cells with fever can signify an autoimmune disease, such as autoimmune thyroid disease.

If you have a fever and low white blood cells, you may have an autoimmune disease, such as autoimmune thyroid disease. In these cases, your doctor will check your thyroid to find the cause of the infection.

Causes of Low White Blood Cell?

White blood cells that are abnormally high or low can indicate some kind of disorder. White blood cell counts below 4,000 cells per microliter are regarded as insufficient. Occasionally, low white blood cell counts may be due to a genetic condition and not necessarily cause alarm. Conditions associated with low white blood cell counts include:

Anyone can suffer from a low white blood cell count. An individual’s white blood cell count may vary based on age, race, gender, and any medical condition. Cancer patients are likely to have low white blood cell counts while undergoing specific treatments.

How is Low White Blood Cell Diagnosed?

Low white blood cell counts can cause fever, sore throats, coughs, and shortness of breath, as well as other inflammation-related symptoms. You will need to communicate how you feel and which symptoms you are experiencing with your healthcare provider. You will also undergo a physical examination. 

By taking a blood test, you can determine your body’s white blood cell count. Other conditions may cause low white blood cell counts. Low white blood cell counts can be caused by bone marrow disorders, medications, and blood disorders.

Low white blood cell count symptoms are hard to ignore. While many of them occur in more severe cases, they can also occur in healthy people. However, the presence of this symptom has to be checked immediately with a healthcare professional.